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filmmusicdaily's Instagram Photo - Earth Day 2017: Spend the weekend with Before The Flood, The 11th Hour, Sherpa and Wildlike. These eye-opening and beautifully-shot films are must-sees! Details on the blog...
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#lakeshorerecords #filmmusicdaily #filmmusic #soundtrack #soundtracksaturday #beforetheflood #rsd #trentreznor #earthday #atticusross #gustavosantaolalla #mogwai #the11thhour #sigurros #sherpafilm #antonypartos #wildlikefilm #dannybensi #saunderjurriaans #moviemusic #earthday #climatechange #socialresponsibility #carbonfootprint #globalwarming #greenhouseeffect #pollution #mothernature #alaska #denalinationalpark

Earth Day 2017: Spend the weekend with Before The Flood, The 11th Hour, Sherpa and Wildlike. These eye-opening and beautifully-shot films are must-sees! Details on the blog... ------------------------------------- 👉🏼 FilmMusicDaily.com ------------------------------------ #lakeshorerecords #filmmusicdaily #filmmusic #soundtrack #soundtracksaturday #beforetheflood #rsd #trentreznor #earthday #atticusross #gustavosantaolalla #mogwai #the11thhour #sigurros #sherpafilm #antonypartos #wildlikefilm #dannybensi #saunderjurriaans #moviemusic #earthday #climatechange #socialresponsibility #carbonfootprint #globalwarming #greenhouseeffect #pollution #mothernature #alaska #denalinationalpark

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iwplay.wid.society's Instagram Photo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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joan_awa's Instagram Photo - There's something about 🇳🇵 that's been drawing me towards it. Incidents like this one and the earthquake in April 2015 (which still needs volunteers to help the community) really gain my interest. My move to the Philippines isn't simply just to get away from here; but it's also because I know it'll bring me closer in trying to understand what's happening in the world, educate myself and help others. || This Year, Nepal. For sure.

#Repost @renan_ozturk with @repostapp
・・・
Three years ago today we were in Everest basecamp when a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

Our goal going into the season was to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

To learn more and support the Nepalese workers please visit @khumbuclimbingcenter @thejuniperfund #sherpafilm ~

Film is available on amazon.com in the US and iTunes in Australia and New Zealand.

There's something about 🇳🇵 that's been drawing me towards it. Incidents like this one and the earthquake in April 2015 (which still needs volunteers to help the community) really gain my interest. My move to the Philippines isn't simply just to get away from here; but it's also because I know it'll bring me closer in trying to understand what's happening in the world, educate myself and help others. || This Year, Nepal. For sure. #repost@renan_ozturk with @repostapp ・・・ Three years ago today we were in Everest basecamp when a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ Our goal going into the season was to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ To learn more and support the Nepalese workers please visit @khumbuclimbingcenter @thejuniperfund #sherpafilm ~ Film is available on amazon.com in the US and iTunes in Australia and New Zealand.

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ig.geography's Instagram Photo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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junfranz59's Instagram Photo - regram @natgeo
Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

regram @natgeo Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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dzul_prime's Instagram Photo - regram @natgeo
Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

regram @natgeo Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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alisonxxxalison's Instagram Photo - Respect to all sherpas. regram @natgeo
Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Respect to all sherpas. regram @natgeo Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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renan_ozturk's Instagram Photo - Three years ago today we were in Everest basecamp when a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

Our goal going into the season was to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

To learn more and support the Nepalese workers please visit @khumbuclimbingcenter @thejuniperfund #sherpafilm ~

Film is available on amazon.com in the US and iTunes in Australia and New Zealand.

Three years ago today we were in Everest basecamp when a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ Our goal going into the season was to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ To learn more and support the Nepalese workers please visit @khumbuclimbingcenter @thejuniperfund #sherpafilm ~ Film is available on amazon.com in the US and iTunes in Australia and New Zealand.

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nicolafocci's Instagram Photo - regram @natgeo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweankerregram - #regrann

regram @natgeo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweankerregram - #regrann

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umm__sadiq's Instagram Photo - #Repost @natgeo with @repostapp
・・・
Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

#repost@natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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margomiracle's Instagram Photo - Моя мечта - совершить восхождение на Эверест. Конечно, скалолаз из меня - как водитель, но пока ещё есть время подготовиться - детки подрастут, можно будет задуматься об этом. серьёзнее. Фото - репост National Geographic @natgeo, у них распродажа фото с подписями авторов в честь дня Земли. Купила к нам домой белую пушистую нерпу, которая прячется под льдиной от ветров, повесим в комнату кого-то из малышей #Repost @natgeo
・・・
Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Моя мечта - совершить восхождение на Эверест. Конечно, скалолаз из меня - как водитель, но пока ещё есть время подготовиться - детки подрастут, можно будет задуматься об этом. серьёзнее. Фото - репост National Geographic @natgeo, у них распродажа фото с подписями авторов в честь дня Земли. Купила к нам домой белую пушистую нерпу, которая прячется под льдиной от ветров, повесим в комнату кого-то из малышей #repost@natgeo ・・・ Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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__iam__pk's Instagram Photo - Repost from @natgeo @TopRankRepost #TopRankRepost Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker
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#somethingintresting#agian#natgeo#instapost @repostapp

Repost from @natgeo @TopRankRepost #toprankrepostPhoto by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker . . . . . . . . . #somethingintresting#agian#natgeo#instapost@repostapp

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pragsrats's Instagram Photo - And some of us just feel proud of the random #trekking we have done in our lives!!! #Repost @natgeo with @repostapp
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Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

And some of us just feel proud of the random #trekkingwe have done in our lives!!! #repost@natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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ex.giannone's Instagram Photo - #Repost @natgeo with @repostapp
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Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

#repost@natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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luvblackcolor's Instagram Photo - Good Bless all the soul @Regrann from @natgeo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker - #regrann

Good Bless all the soul @Regrann from @natgeo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker - #regrann

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natgeo's Instagram Photo - Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~

This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~

I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~

#russianrulette #dangerousjobs #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm #HeroesOfTheHimalya @conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

Photo by @renan_ozturk @khumbuclimbingcenter // Oxygen tanks, heavy loads, and precarious steps on Everest. Three years ago today, the day after this picture was taken, a 30-million-pound block of ice collapsed above the treacherous icefall on the standard climbing route. It killed 16 Nepalese high-altitude workers. ~ This is what it looks like for a lot of these workers inside the the Khumbu icefall. While most Westerners only go through the icefall a few times a season, these guys do countless rotations up and down to stock the upper camps. The icefall, a necessary hazard of climbing the south side of Everest, is a maze of giant ice towers and crevasses that can, and do, collapse without warning. These rickety ladders must be continuously re-jiggered throughout the season. In base camp after the avalanche tragedy, we saw the size of the loads some of the Sherpas were carrying that day. They were so huge it made it near impossible to run away from the falling ice blocks. These are the hazards that everyone faces though—Sherpas, Western guides, and climbers together. ~ I was there as part of a film project to document the Sherpas perspective on Everest over the years—this was the breaking point for the high-altitude workforce and a chance to portray the state of affairs and lack of government support. This accident did not slow down the international desire to stand on top of the world. But it did shift the way in which these workers are compensated and insured. The season was canceled, and it became clear to the world that to summit Everest requires the support of these Nepalese people. ~ #russianrulette #dangerousjobs #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm #heroesofthehimalya@conrad_anker @jenniloweanker

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lellykd's Instagram Photo - #Repost @natgeo with @repostapp
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Photo by @renan_ozturk // The insane triple stack 90-KG of duffle bags headed up the long, 10-day trek to Everest base camp. One important thing to note is that Sherpas with a capital “S” are not porters, but the ethnicity of people who inhabit the Everest region. With a lowercase “s,” sherpas have widely become known to the general public as specialized, high-altitude porters on Everest and other high Himalayan peaks. The porter pictured here is actually from the Tamang ethnicity, which is one of the many lower-land cultures of Nepal. Hardly any Sherpas take work portering loads such as this but rather play their odds in the more dangerous work of high-altitude guiding and rigging, piloting fixed-wing planes, or running the lodges. I have to say that a lot of the lower-land porters working in the Khumbu are some of the strongest, happiest, and hardest working people I have ever met! It is especially mind-blowing when they carry these loads wearing flip flops, even while crossing suspension bridges with heavy consequences. #NepaliLoveYou #SherpaFilm

#repost@natgeo with @repostapp ・・・ Photo by @renan_ozturk // The insane triple stack 90-KG of duffle bags headed up the long, 10-day trek to Everest base camp. One important thing to note is that Sherpas with a capital “S” are not porters, but the ethnicity of people who inhabit the Everest region. With a lowercase “s,” sherpas have widely become known to the general public as specialized, high-altitude porters on Everest and other high Himalayan peaks. The porter pictured here is actually from the Tamang ethnicity, which is one of the many lower-land cultures of Nepal. Hardly any Sherpas take work portering loads such as this but rather play their odds in the more dangerous work of high-altitude guiding and rigging, piloting fixed-wing planes, or running the lodges. I have to say that a lot of the lower-land porters working in the Khumbu are some of the strongest, happiest, and hardest working people I have ever met! It is especially mind-blowing when they carry these loads wearing flip flops, even while crossing suspension bridges with heavy consequences. #nepaliloveyou #SherpaFilm

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meetmeateverest's Instagram Photo - One last watch of the documentary "Sherpa - Trouble on Everest" before our imminent departure

One last watch of the documentary "Sherpa - Trouble on Everest" before our imminent departure

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holmfirth_film_festival's Instagram Photo - Described as "awe-inspiring scenery" in the Guardian (full review in the bio), here's a collection of some beautiful stills from our next film, Sherpa, showing this Sunday at the picturedrome at 7:30. #filmfestival #holmevalley #film #holmfirth #holmfirthfilmfestival #sherpa #sherpafilm #stills #northwest #northwestevents

Described as "awe-inspiring scenery" in the Guardian (full review in the bio), here's a collection of some beautiful stills from our next film, Sherpa, showing this Sunday at the picturedrome at 7:30. #filmfestival #holmevalley #film #holmfirth #holmfirthfilmfestival #sherpa #sherpafilm #stills #northwest #northwestevents

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video_nusantara's Instagram Photo - Ini keren asli 😍.
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Someday.
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Repost @natgeo - Video by @renan_ozturk // The daily sea of clouds that rushes up the valley in the Khumbu Himalaya towards the highest point on earth. Shot from the summit of Lobuche peak while acclimatizing for an ascent of Everest in order to document it from the Sherpa perspective. ~

These days many western climbers sleep on this safe neighboring peak while the Sherpas and other high altitude Nepali workers take the lions share of the risk carrying equipment up and down the dangerous Khumbu icefall. #SherpaFilm @jenpeedom @camp4collective

Media partner
@pendakimedia

Ini keren asli 😍. . Someday. . Repost @natgeo - Video by @renan_ozturk // The daily sea of clouds that rushes up the valley in the Khumbu Himalaya towards the highest point on earth. Shot from the summit of Lobuche peak while acclimatizing for an ascent of Everest in order to document it from the Sherpa perspective. ~ These days many western climbers sleep on this safe neighboring peak while the Sherpas and other high altitude Nepali workers take the lions share of the risk carrying equipment up and down the dangerous Khumbu icefall. #SherpaFilm @jenpeedom @camp4collective Media partner @pendakimedia

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